Too Many Bills?

How ZAP Can Help You

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Bill problems can lead to serious consequences unless they are resolved between you and the creditor before they become a legal battle. Not only does an unsettled matter become an additional financial burden, but it can also create stress and anxiety with individuals and their family.

In addition, court costs and attorneys charged to the account, plus late charges and interest may, in some cases, double or even triple the original amount of the debt. Legal processes, from the beginning when a lawsuit is filed to the end when a judgment is entered increases the balance due on the account.

Court appearances are required which will cost time lost from a job and, in turn, results in lost wages. Eventually, the creditor will garnish paychecks or freeze any funds in bank accounts, all the while continuing to add more interest and attorney fees to the balance owed. In some cases, liens can be placed on a person’s property.

When these legal actions occur, it is vital that legal counsel is sought. Zalutsky & Pinski have 50 years of experience in dealing with situations which require immediate legal intervention and response. We offer a free consultation that will cover any questions relative to what can be done to rectify the problems. We will also consider any actions that may be taken through the Bankruptcy Court that can either relieve the situation or stop any actions immediately.

The Bankruptcy Code allows individuals, even during their legal battles, to file for relief and either eliminate their unsecured debts or work out a reasonable repayment plan. Bankruptcy can help resolve bill problems and financial legal matters while working within the framework of each individual’s own affordability.

Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 can be filed depending on the nature of the lawsuit and/or judgment. Consideration is given to the person’s income and expenses in dealing with the entire problem. This approach offers the opportunity to address and solve debt problem with minimum expense and maximum relief.

By Kerrie Neal